After 45 years of managing diabetes, Brenda received Kendrick, her first service dog from SDWR. The dog will not only provide support during times of crisis but also help her to live a more independent and less anxiety-filled life. Brenda’s service dog will be able to accompany her everywhere thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Diabetes limits Brenda’s independence and causes her emotional distress because she, her husband and family are constantly worried about her blood sugar levels. With her Diabetic Alert Dog, Kendrick, by her side Brenda and her family are hopeful that she will gain the confidence to face the everyday challenges of living with the disease.

SDWR will continue to work with Brenda and Kendrick in her home environment, to train for specific needs she may have. What makes SDWR so unique from other nonprofit service dog organizations is this highly customized and tailored training program. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Brenda, her family, and Kendrick every 3-4 months during the next 18 months to make a successful team and gain public access certification.

As an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program (FOPP), the service dog is named after fallen hero Police Officer R. Shelly Kendrick of the Bessemer Police Department in Alabama. FOPP, is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Alert Dog Kendrick’s work with Brenda will carry on in memoriam of Police Officer R. Shelly’s life of service before self.

About SDWR:

Service Dogs by SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred dogs for individuals of all ages with invisible disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder, PTSD, Seizure Disorder, or in the case of Brenda — Diabetes. In addition to the nearly 600 working dogs already placed, there are several hundred more actively enrolled in SDWR’s program.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, http://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a service dog raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities.

After 5 years of sleepless nights filled with worry about their daughter’s blood sugar, Maryann and Jeff are looking forward to the extra help their daughter’s service dog, Beth will bring. Samantha’s service dog will be able to accompany her everywhere thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Diabetes affects Samantha’s independence. She often requires cues and reminders from her parents to manage her diabetes. With her Diabetic Alert Dog, Beth, by her side Samantha and her family are hopeful that she will gain the confidence and independence to face the everyday challenges of living with diabetes.

SDWR will continue to work with Samantha, her parents and Beth in their home environment, to train for specific needs she may have. What makes SDWR so unique from other nonprofit service dog organizations is this highly customized and tailored training program. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Samantha, her family, and Beth every 3-4 months during the next 18 months to make a successful team and gain public access certification.

As an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program (FOPP), the service dog is named after fallen hero Correctional Officer Amanda Beth Baker of the Scotts Bluff County Detention Center, Nebraska. FOPP is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Alert Dog Beth’s work with Samantha will carry on in memoriam of Correctional Officer Amanda Beth Baker’s life of service before self.

About SDWR:
Service Dogs by SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred dogs for individuals of all ages with invisible disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder, PTSD, Seizure Disorder, or in the case of Samantha – Diabetes. In addition to the nearly 600 working dogs already placed, there are several hundred more actively enrolled in SDWR’s program.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, http://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a service dog raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

Tristen, a 9-year old boy in Mentor, Ohio, has received a very generous $7,500 Grant towards his very own Autism Service Dog from SDWR.
$7,500 SDWR Autism Service Dog Grant Awarded to 9-Year-Old Boy in Mentor, OHMentor, OH, April 24, 2019 — Tristen, a 9-year old boy living in Mentor, Ohio, has received a very generous $7,500 Grant towards his very own Autism Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” to assist him and help better communicate his needs. SDWR, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in Virginia, is one of the nation’s largest service dog providers with over 600 service dogs placed. SDWR is now serving over 1,000 families through its programs. SDWR breeds, trains, and places service dogs to adults and children with invisible disabilities such as Diabetes, Seizure Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or in the case of Tristen – Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” is known for its customized training methods that aid those with invisible disabilities. In recognition of April being Autism Awareness Month, SDWR sponsored a Grant Program for Autism Service Dogs. The grant program is for individuals in North America diagnosed as being on the Autism spectrum, to include Aspergers. SDWR accepted applications throughout the month of March and a great deal of their decision making process in determining who received an Autism Grant relied heavily on the essay portion of the application.

Tristen was diagnosed with Autism at the age of 3-years-old. Not only is Tristen on the autism spectrum, but he also suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Tristen has aggressive episodes with elopement at school and he also has night terrors that wake him up at night. A service dog will help him to recognize when he needs to calm down and hopefully intervene before reaching the elopement or aggression stage. Tristen is constantly making comments about how he is lonely and wants a friend. An Autism Service Dog will also give him the companionship he is desperately seeking. Tristen’s family is hopeful that a service dog will act as a guardian for him and help keep him safe.

SDWR has awarded several grant opportunities to help families with loved ones on the Autistic Spectrum alleviate funding efforts for their very own Autism Service Dog. SDWR has awarded four $7,500 grants, two $10,000 grants, two $12,500 grants, as well as awarding two lucky families a full $25,000 Autism Service Dog Grant. For existing clients, the SDWR grant covers up to $10,000 towards an outstanding pledge or the remaining balances, whichever is less. The selection process is based on ability to care for the service dog after placement, ability to follow SDWR’s training program, the information on the application, and participation in allowing SDWR to publish benchmark moments about the service dog and handler.

SDWR has developed a unique program for training dogs to support children and individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. Not only can service dogs provide an overall calming effect for the child on the autism spectrum, but there are a number of tasks the dogs can be taught, too. These tasks include finding the child if lost, serving as stationary ballast in the case of elopement, and providing redirection from repetitive or self-injurious behaviors among other tasks. When paired with a service dog, children on the autism spectrum often have improved sleep patterns, increased social interaction, and a better ability to express themselves.

SDWR provides high quality Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and hypoallergenic breeds (exclusively for those with verifiable allergies, additional pledge will apply) that are suitable for service work. SDWR has developed a partnership with their breeders coupled with unsurpassed training, allowing them to offer their clients another tool to better manage their life of dealing with a spectrum disorder.

SDWR delivers some of the highest-quality and personable service dogs to families who are affected by an invisible illness. Unlike most other service dog organizations, SDWR’s trainers travel to the client’s home over a period of 12-18 months for continued personalized training. This is because they firmly believe that the families should receive as much training and education as their service dogs do.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.”

To learn more about the types of service dogs SDWR offers for those living with invisible disabilities, visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/.

To make a donation, be a sponsor of a future grant, or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, www.sdwr.org.

autismLawrence, MA, April 19, 2019 – Max, an 8-year old boy living in Lawrence, Massachusetts, has received a very generous $12,500 Grant towards his very own Autism Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” to assist him and help better communicate his needs. SDWR, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in Virginia, is one of the nation’s largest service dog providers with over 600 service dogs placed. SDWR is now serving over 1,000 families through its programs. SDWR breeds, trains, and places service dogs to adults and children with invisible disabilities such as Diabetes, Seizure Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or in the case of Max – Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” is known for its customized training methods that aid those with invisible disabilities. In recognition of April being Autism Awareness Month, SDWR sponsored a Grant Program for Autism Service Dogs. The grant program is for individuals in North America diagnosed as being on the Autism spectrum, to include Aspergers. SDWR accepted applications throughout the month of March and a great deal of their decision making process in determining who received an Autism Grant relied heavily on the essay portion of the application.

Max was diagnosed with autism at 18 months old. Not only is Max on the Autism Spectrum, but he also suffers from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Communication Disorder, and ADHD. Max’s family is hoping to obtain a service dog which will help ground him, provide warmth and slight pressure when irritable, aid in elopement prevention, distract and redirect him when self-harming, and ultimately be his best friend. Max is a curious, energetic, and determined eight year old boy. He is also nonverbal, hyperactive, irritable, obsessive, destructive, and self-directed with little-to-no safety awareness. Among some of Max’s most challenging behaviors is his persistent urge to bolt or wander from familiar as well as unfamiliar places. Recently, he began to self-injure himself when frustrated by biting his own extremities with force. In addition, he picks and tears the skin around his finger and toe nail beds until they are raw and sore, or worse, draw blood. He struggles with staying in one place for any length of time, often pacing or jumping up and down in the same spot. Max’s family is hopeful that a service dog will act as a guardian for him and help keep him safe.

SDWR has awarded several grant opportunities to help families with loved ones on the Autistic Spectrum alleviate funding efforts for their very own Autism Service Dog. SDWR has awarded four $7,500 grants, two $10,000 grants, two $12,500 grants, as well as awarding two lucky families a full $25,000 Autism Service Dog Grant. For existing clients, the SDWR grant covers up to $10,000 towards an outstanding pledge or the remaining balances, whichever is less. The selection process is based on ability to care for the service dog after placement, ability to follow SDWR’s training program, the information on the application, and participation in allowing SDWR to publish benchmark moments about the service dog and handler.

SDWR has developed a unique program for training dogs to support children and individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. Not only can service dogs provide an overall calming effect for the child on the autism spectrum, but there are a number of tasks the dogs can be taught, too. These tasks include finding the child if lost, serving as stationary ballast in the case of elopement, and providing redirection from repetitive or self-injurious behaviors among other tasks. When paired with a service dog, children on the autism spectrum often have improved sleep patterns, increased social interaction, and a better ability to express themselves.

SDWR provides high quality Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and hypoallergenic breeds (exclusively for those with verifiable allergies, additional pledge will apply) that are suitable for service work. SDWR has developed a partnership with their breeders coupled with unsurpassed training, allowing them to offer their clients another tool to better manage their life of dealing with a spectrum disorder.

SDWR delivers some of the highest-quality and personable service dogs to families who are affected by an invisible illness. Unlike most other service dog organizations, SDWR’s trainers travel to the client’s home over a period of 12-18 months for continued personalized training. This is because they firmly believe that the families should receive as much training and education as their service dogs do.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.”

To learn more about the types of service dogs SDWR offers for those living with invisible disabilities, visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/.

To make a donation, be a sponsor of a future grant, or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, www.sdwr.org.

autismGaithersburg, MD, April 10, 2019 — Keegan, an 8-year old boy living in Gaithersburg, Maryland, has received a very generous $10,000 Grant towards his very own Autism Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” to assist him and help better communicate his needs. SDWR, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in Virginia, is one of the nation’s largest service dog providers with over 600 service dogs placed. SDWR is now serving over 1,000 families through its programs. SDWR breeds, trains, and places service dogs to adults and children with invisible disabilities such as Diabetes, Seizure Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or in the case of Keegan – Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” is known for its customized training methods that aid those with invisible disabilities. In recognition of April being Autism Awareness Month, SDWR sponsored a Grant Program for Autism Service Dogs. The grant program is for individuals in North America diagnosed as being on the Autism spectrum, to include Aspergers. SDWR accepted applications throughout the month of March and a great deal of their decision making process in determining who received an Autism Grant relied heavily on the essay portion of the application.

Keegan was diagnosed with Autism and ADHD at the age of 2-years-old. Due to Keegan’s sensory issues and anxiety he often runs away without warning when he feels stressed. He has limited language and often has difficulty find his way back to his family. Keegan has absence seizures, which are treated with medication and are under control. He has ADHD and is impulsive, which often puts him in dangerous situations like jumping off high places and into bodies of water or running into the street. He has very limited social skills for his age and as a result has trouble making friends. Keegan’s family is hopeful that a service dog will act as a guardian for him and help keep him safe and comfort him.

SDWR has awarded several grant opportunities to help families with loved ones on the Autistic Spectrum alleviate funding efforts for their very own Autism Service Dog. SDWR has awarded four $7,500 grants, two $10,000 grants, two $12,500 grants, as well as awarding two lucky families a full $25,000 Autism Service Dog Grant. For existing clients, the SDWR grant covers up to $10,000 towards an outstanding pledge or the remaining balances, whichever is less. The selection process is based on ability to care for the service dog after placement, ability to follow SDWR’s training program, the information on the application, and participation in allowing SDWR to publish benchmark moments about the service dog and handler.

SDWR has developed a proprietary and unique program for training dogs to support individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. Not only can service dogs provide an overall calming effect for the child on the autism spectrum, but there are a number of tasks the dogs can be taught too. These tasks include finding the child if lost, serving as stationary ballast in the case of elopement, and providing redirection from repetitive or self-injurious behaviors among other tasks. When paired with a service dog, children on the autism spectrum often have improved sleep patterns, increased social interaction, and a better ability to express themselves.

SDWR provides high quality Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and hypoallergenic breeds (exclusively for those with verifiable allergies, additional pledge will apply) that are suitable for service work. SDWR has developed a partnership with their breeders coupled with unsurpassed training, allowing them to offer their clients another tool to better manage their life of dealing with a spectrum disorder.

SDWR delivers some of the highest-quality and personable service dogs to families who are affected by an invisible illness. Unlike most other service dog organizations, SDWR’s trainers travel to the client’s home over a period of 12-18 months for continued personalized training. This is because they firmly believe that the families should receive as much training and education as their service dogs do.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.”

To learn more about the types of service dogs SDWR offers for those living with invisible disabilities, visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/.

To make a donation, be a sponsor of a future grant, or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, www.sdwr.org.

seizureCleveland, OH, April 10, 2019 – A 22-year-old woman named Hannah living in Cleveland, Ohio, has just received an extremely special Seizure Response Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR. Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” has a mission to provide specially bred dogs for individuals of all ages with invisible disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder, PTSD, Diabetes, or in the case of Hannah — Seizure Disorder. In addition to hundreds of working dogs already placed, there are over 400 families enrolled in SDWR’s program awaiting their service dog delivery.

Hannah was diagnosed with epilepsy as an infant and with schizencephaly at the age of 18-years-old. Hannah’s epilepsy severely limits her independence and causes her emotional distress by worrying about having a seizure. With Rose by her side, Hannah is confident that having a Seizure Response Dog will provide her with the independence she needs to face the everyday challenges of living with epilepsy.

Rose is also an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program. The Fallen Officer Puppy Program, also known as “FOPP,” is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Rose is named in honor of fallen hero Deputy Sheriff Rosemary Vela of the Madison County Sheriff’s Office in Tennessee who was killed in a single vehicle crash while responding to backup another deputy. Rose’s work as a Seizure Response Service Dog with Hannah will carry on in memoriam of Deputy Sheriff Vela’s life of service before self.

With the new arrival of Rose, Hannah will have a four-legged tool that has received foundational training to not only assist Hannah during seizures, but also help her to live a more independent and less anxiety-filled life. Thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Hannah’s service dog will be able to accompany her everywhere– from going to restaurants, to running errands, and even to work.

SDWR will continue to work with Hannah and Rose in her home environment, to train for specific needs she may have. What makes SDWR so unique from other nonprofit service dog organizations is this highly customized and tailored training program. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Hannah and her family along with Rose for the next 18 months every 3-4 months to continue fine tuning Rose’s skills to best fit their lifestyle and Hannah’s disability.

What sets SDWR apart from other nonprofit service dog organizations, is that they have no age restrictions and none of the enrolled families ever travel in order to receive their service dog or participate in team training. SDWR’s customized training methods and careful considerations are made in order to match every service dog to their “person.” Hannah’s service dog will work with the SDWR trainers over an 18-month training program towards public access training and certification. Through hard work and dedication of the organization and Hannah they must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, http://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Seizure Response Service Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/seizure-response/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a service dog raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

NEW WASHINGTON, OH, UNITED STATES, April 4, 2019 – Brenden, a 12-year old boy living in New Washington, Ohio, has received a very special delivery today of his very own Autism Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR to assist him and help better communicate his needs. Based in Madison, Virginia, Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for people with invisible disabilities like Diabetes, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, or in the case of Brenden – Autism Spectrum Disorder. SDWR has hundreds of service dogs working across the United States and around the globe. SDWR is currently serving approximately 1,000 families.

Jewell, a labrador retriever Autism Service Dog, recently graduated from SDWR’s Service Dog Raiser Programwhere volunteers diligently raise young service dogs in training over the course of approximately one year. Both the dogs and raisers must complete the foundation and skill set training provided through SDWR trainers at their facility in Virginia.

Jewell is also an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program. The Fallen Officer Puppy Program, also known as “FOPP,” is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Jewell is named in honor of fallen hero Officer Coburn B. Jewell of the California Highway Patrol who was killed when his cruiser was struck by another vehicle. Jewell’s work as an Autism Service Dog with Brenden will carry on in memoriam of Officer Jewell’s life of service before self.

Brenden was diagnosed with Autism at the age of 4-years-old. Brenden tends to not make good choices and sometimes makes unsafe decisions. He struggles with elopement issues and has wandered off a few times and also runs from flying insects. Brenden’s family is hopeful that a service dog will act as a guardian for him and help keep him safe and comfort him.

Jewell will assist in reducing the effects each diagnosis has on the family’s independence and daily life by working continuously with Brenden. Since Jewell is a service dog and covered under laws in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, he will be able to accompany Brenden and his family everywhere – from school, to the grocery store, and even to church on Sundays.

SDWR’s unique training program is what sets them apart from other non-profit service dog organizations. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Brenden, his family, and Jewell every 3-4 months over the course of the next 18 months to continue working on Jewell’s customized training, follow up training and training the human to make a successful team and public access certification.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a nonprofit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.” To make or donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Autism Service Dogs go to https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/autism/. To find out how you can volunteer as a puppy raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

CENTERBURG, OH, UNITED STATES, March 31, 2019 – Brian, a 16-year-old boy in Centerburg, Ohio, received a very special delivery today of his very own Diabetic Alert Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR. Based in Madison, Virginia, Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for people of all ages that struggle with living with invisible disabilities such as Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, or in the case of Brian—Type 1 Diabetes. SDWR has hundreds of working service dogs placed around the globe and is currently serving approximately 1,000 families.

Kami, a labrador retriever Diabetic Alert Dog, has already received countless hours of training through SDWR’s service dog raiser program where volunteers raise puppies in training for approximately one year. The dogs and raisers must follow through the foundation and skill set training provided through SDWR trainers at the facility in Virginia.

Kami is also an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program. The Fallen Officer Puppy Program, also known as “FOPP,” is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Kami is named in honor of fallen hero Police Officer Robert Kaminski of the New York City Police Department who died as a direct result of illnesses he contracted after inhaling toxic materials as he participated in the rescue and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center site following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Kami’s work as a Diabetic Alert Service Dog with Brian will carry on in memoriam of Officer Kaminski’s life of service before self.

Brian was diagnosed with Diabetes when he was 13-years-old. Brian hopes that a service dog will be able to alert him when he is sleeping and in between checks. Brian is Type 1 Diabetic and is insulin dependent. Brian needs to be able to live independently to be able to go away to college but is a very deep sleeper and does not wake up to his Dexcom alarms overnight. He attends many campouts and outings as an active teen and believes having a service dog will help alert of blood sugars. A service dog able to get help if needed would help give Brian’s family the much needed peace of mind. Brian monitors his blood sugars 24 hours a day to stay alive. If his BG is too high, he needs to take a corrective does of insulin. If his BG is too low. he needs to have a fast acting glucose. Not keeping his blood sugars in a healthy range can cause further damage to his body and/or lead to death. Brian is optimistic that with the addition of a service dog it will help make his life a little easier and provide a sense of independence and security.
SDWR uses a proprietary scent training method to teach Diabetic Alert Dogs to detect fluctuations in blood sugar that fall outside of a handler’s healthy range.

Since Kami is a service dog and covered under laws in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, he will be able to accompany Brian everywhere—from church, to the grocery store, even camping.
During the upcoming 18 months, SDWR will return to Brian’s home every 3-4 months to continue working on Kami’s customized training, follow up training and training the human to make a successful team and public access certification. This certification can only be given to Brian after a progression of hard work and dedication to the SDWR training program. This training program is what sets SDWR apart from other nonprofit service dog organizations.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a nonprofit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs visit www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To learn more about SDWR’s Fallen Officer Puppy Program visit www.sdwr.org/fallen-officer-puppy-program/.

Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” is known for its customized training methods and proprietary scent training for their service dogs that aid those with invisible disabilities. In recognition of April being Autism Awareness Month, SDWR is sponsoring a Grant Program for Autism Service Dogs. The grant program is for individuals in North America diagnosed as being on the Autism spectrum, to include Aspergers. SDWR will be accepting applications until March 31st, 2019 at 11:59 pm. A great deal of their decision making process in determining who receives an Autism Grant will rely heavily on the essay portion of the application.

SDWR, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization located in Virginia, is one of the nation’s largest service dog providers with over 600 service dogs placed. SDWR is now serving over 1,000 families through its programs. SDWR breeds, trains, and places service dogs to adults and children with invisible disabilities such as Diabetes, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Seizure Disorders, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

SDWR will be offering several grant opportunities to help families with loved ones on the Autistic Spectrum alleviate funding efforts for their very own Autism Service Dog. SDWR is offering four $7,500 grants, two $10,000 grants, two $12,500 grants, as well as awarding one lucky family a full $25,000 Autism Service Dog Grant. For existing clients, the SDWR grant covers up to $10,000 towards an outstanding pledge or the remaining balances, whichever is less.

SDWR asks that those interested in applying for an Autism Service Dog Grant opportunity read their regulations and guidelines on their website. The selection process will be based on ability to care for the service dog after placement, ability to follow SDWR’s training program, the information on the application, and participation in allowing SDWR to publish benchmark moments about the service dog and handler.

SDWR has developed a proprietary and unique program for training dogs to support individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. Not only can service dogs provide an overall calming effect for the child on the autism spectrum, but there are a number of tasks the dogs can be taught too. These tasks include finding the child if lost, serving as stationary ballast in the case of elopement, and providing redirection from repetitive or self-injurious behaviors among other tasks. When paired with a service dog, children on the autism spectrum often have improved sleep patterns, increased social interaction, and a better ability to express themselves.

SDWR provides high quality Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and hypoallergenic breeds (exclusively for those with verifiable allergies, additional pledge will apply) that are suitable for service work. SDWR has developed a partnership with their breeders coupled with unsurpassed training, allowing them to offer their clients another tool to better manage their life of dealing with a spectrum disorder.

SDWR delivers some of the highest-quality and personable service dogs to families who are affected by an invisible illness. Unlike most other service dog organizations, SDWR’s trainers travel to the client’s home over a period of 12-18 months for continued personalized training. This is because they firmly believe that the families should receive as much training and education as their service dogs do.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.”

In order to participate in their Autism Service Dog Grant opportunity, SDWR asks that those interested follow their regulations and guidelines on their website at www.sdwr.org/autism-grant-application.

To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, www.sdwr.org.

Diabetic Alert DogLuke, a 38-year-old man in Los Angeles, California, received a very special delivery today of his very own Diabetic Alert Service Dog from Service Dogs by SDWR. Based in Madison, Virginia, Service Dogs by SDWR, or “SDWR,” has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for people of all ages that struggle with living with invisible disabilities such as Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, or in the case of Luke—Type 1 Diabetes. SDWR has hundreds of working service dogs placed around the globe and is currently serving approximately 1,000 families.