After 45 years of managing diabetes, Brenda received Kendrick, her first service dog from SDWR. The dog will not only provide support during times of crisis but also help her to live a more independent and less anxiety-filled life. Brenda’s service dog will be able to accompany her everywhere thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Diabetes limits Brenda’s independence and causes her emotional distress because she, her husband and family are constantly worried about her blood sugar levels. With her Diabetic Alert Dog, Kendrick, by her side Brenda and her family are hopeful that she will gain the confidence to face the everyday challenges of living with the disease.

SDWR will continue to work with Brenda and Kendrick in her home environment, to train for specific needs she may have. What makes SDWR so unique from other nonprofit service dog organizations is this highly customized and tailored training program. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Brenda, her family, and Kendrick every 3-4 months during the next 18 months to make a successful team and gain public access certification.

As an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program (FOPP), the service dog is named after fallen hero Police Officer R. Shelly Kendrick of the Bessemer Police Department in Alabama. FOPP, is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Alert Dog Kendrick’s work with Brenda will carry on in memoriam of Police Officer R. Shelly’s life of service before self.

About SDWR:

Service Dogs by SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred dogs for individuals of all ages with invisible disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder, PTSD, Seizure Disorder, or in the case of Brenda — Diabetes. In addition to the nearly 600 working dogs already placed, there are several hundred more actively enrolled in SDWR’s program.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, http://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a service dog raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities.

After 5 years of sleepless nights filled with worry about their daughter’s blood sugar, Maryann and Jeff are looking forward to the extra help their daughter’s service dog, Beth will bring. Samantha’s service dog will be able to accompany her everywhere thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Diabetes affects Samantha’s independence. She often requires cues and reminders from her parents to manage her diabetes. With her Diabetic Alert Dog, Beth, by her side Samantha and her family are hopeful that she will gain the confidence and independence to face the everyday challenges of living with diabetes.

SDWR will continue to work with Samantha, her parents and Beth in their home environment, to train for specific needs she may have. What makes SDWR so unique from other nonprofit service dog organizations is this highly customized and tailored training program. SDWR trainers will continue to return for training sessions with Samantha, her family, and Beth every 3-4 months during the next 18 months to make a successful team and gain public access certification.

As an honored graduate of the SDWR Fallen Officer Puppy Program (FOPP), the service dog is named after fallen hero Correctional Officer Amanda Beth Baker of the Scotts Bluff County Detention Center, Nebraska. FOPP is an initiative by SDWR to pay respect to the legacy of service by fallen American police who sacrificed their lives in the line of duty. Alert Dog Beth’s work with Samantha will carry on in memoriam of Correctional Officer Amanda Beth Baker’s life of service before self.

About SDWR:
Service Dogs by SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred dogs for individuals of all ages with invisible disabilities like Autism Spectrum Disorder, PTSD, Seizure Disorder, or in the case of Samantha – Diabetes. In addition to the nearly 600 working dogs already placed, there are several hundred more actively enrolled in SDWR’s program.

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Virginia, and relies on donations to help the organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, http://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a service dog raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

It was 9 months between my acceptance into the SDWR program for a Diabetic Alert Dog and the ‘delivery’ of my wonderful and amazing service dog, Winston. The same gestational timeframe as a human baby!  

During that 9 months of waiting for his delivery, I had many emotions. Unbridled enthusiasm and excitement for the positive ways my life would change once I got my Service Dog. Fears about whether the dog that SDWR chose for me would be a good fit. Occasional self-doubt about whether or not I had what it took to be the owner/master of such a special dog. A belief that it would all be ‘okay’ because my dog would be the perfect Service Dog.

Service Dog

Winston hard at work!

Once I found out the type, name, and sex of my dog 5 months into the gestation, I started to fall in love. I saw photos and videos of “MY DOG!” I looked at the images over and over again, told all my loved ones about my special dog, and envisioned the life we would have together once he arrived. I saw myself walking peacefully in the park while he strode gently beside me. I imagined him alerting me every time my blood sugars were too high or too low. I saw him being cued in to me at all hours of the day and night. And, I saw him being perfectly gentlemanly in all situations because after all… he’s a Service Dog, right?

So, then my baby arrived! The trainer opened the door for him to greet me and that 65 pound beautiful Golden Lab jumps out of the car, runs to me for a quick hug, and then bolts into the backyard with a burst of energy that took me a little by surprise! What? He didn’t stay in my arms and tell me at that moment that I actually had a low blood sugar (because I was so nervous about his delivery that I was burning through my on-board glucose rapidly)?

This was my first lesson in one of the most beautiful things about Service Dogs from SDWR — they get to be dogs too! He had been in a car for three days, traveling from Virginia to Washington State. He was thrilled to have a big grassy yard to stretch his legs and burn off some of the energy he had been storing up. My baby entered in to my world with the most joy I had ever seen in an animal. We played fetch, we ran around together, and we eventually collapsed together in one of those amazing dog-human embraces that immediately reassured me that my pup was meant for me and we would have an amazing future together.

Over the next few weeks, I learned so much about what it meant to really have a Service Dog. Again, a broad array of emotions. Some expected, some not. My biggest surprise was how quickly he bonded with me. Wow! I felt loved by him immediately and that bond continues to grow daily even though it’s hard to believe it could become better than it was the day before. His personality couldn’t be more perfect for me… He’s up for all the adventures we share – kayaking, hiking, river rafting, fly fishing, and traveling far and wide on a plane or in a car. He is also unbelievably calm and gentle with all people and animals – not aggressive or possessive in any way. He follows me around wherever I go and looks at me with those puppy eyes like I’m the greatest thing in the universe. I fell in love quickly and deeply.

There were also some confusing things. He alerted well but wasn’t always right and sometimes missed an alert. He walked beautifully beside me but sometimes pulled on the leash when he saw another dog across the street or that was barking behind a fence. I bought him an expensive dog bed but he mostly liked to just sleep on the hard floor. I sometimes felt his behavior did not match my expectations for the “perfectly behaved” Service Dog. That felt frustrating sometimes, as it meant I had to put in some extra training time to support the behaviors that I needed him to have.

 

So, What Have I Learned?

  1. Your Service Dog will love you like crazy!
  2. Loving your Service Dog in return requires you to not only be loving, but also to be attentive to your dog’s needs.
  3. SDWR is extremely responsive to and supportive of helping you develop the best relationship as is possible with your dog. Their 18-month training follow up (which includes weekly reports, face-to-face visits, and responsiveness to phone calls and emails) will help you to work through any kinks in your dog’s training and help you to be a more knowledgeable and confident dog owner and trainer.
  4. Your dog will garner a lot of positive public attention! People see a dog with a Service Vest on and they immediately feel good. People may stare or may come up to you with questions about your dog. I have found this to be a wonderful way to be an ambassador for the benefits of Service Dogs (and SDWR) as well as an educator about my disease.
  5. Following your dog’s arrival, there will be an adjustment period. Everything you do now will include planning for what your dog needs, too. Do you have snacks, food, water, waste bags, his vest, and his leash when you leave home? Doing errands will take longer because you have to account for the time it will take to attend to your dog. Are you prepared for some of the shedding your dog will do? All of these things may feel like a big deal in the beginning but will really become second nature in a short period of time. You WILL make the adjustment and you WILL continuously be rewarded for the time, love, patience, and effort you put in to maintaining your dog’s training and well-being.

 

Tips on Training and Caring for Your Dog’s Needs:

  • He will need continuous training to keep his skills finely tuned, to nurture new skills, and to address missteps – that are bound to happen as, after all… these are dogs, not machines.
  • He will need you to establish yourself as the “boss,” the “parent,” the “alpha dog,” whatever you want to call it. He needs YOU to set the parameters for his behavior otherwise, like a child; he could push the boundaries and try to get away with things he knows are naughty.
  • He will need consistency, persistence, and firmness from you. This is not discipline, it is setting clear limits that help your dog to really trust you and know that you care for his welfare.
  • He will also need good vet care, good nutrition, and lots of time to ‘just be a dog.’ Your dog’s health and love for you will be enhanced with playtime! Run around the yard with him, play fetch, take him on interesting walks, find out which toys he likes.
  • You dog will need your patience and calmness. If you get impatient, anxious, uptight, nervous, angry, or obviously frustrated with your dog, he will ‘sense’ this and this could make him struggle with getting back on task. Remember, our Service Dogs are highly sensitive and attuned to us, so they will easily be able to ‘pick up’ on our negative feelings about them.

 

So, welcome to the amazing, wild, precious, exciting, and remarkable journey with your Service Dog. Speak up with your questions. You’ve put a lot of time and energy into getting your Service Dog and expressing what you need will be continually helpful to you and your beloved companion. Every dog and every recipient is extremely important and SDWR will always be there for support!

Tracee and Winston

 

To find out more information and to apply for your own SDWR Diabetic Alert Dog please visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/.

diabetic alert dogSDWR Review

Diabetic Alert Dog Team: Mavis & Haley

Our daughter’s service dog was delivered this week and we are so thrilled with everything from the dog to the trainer. Cheri was amazing and I can’t describe the impact she had on our family. She was so calm and relaxed and put us at ease. Mavis is just the most beautiful and special dog. When she alerted the first time, it was truly a touching and special moment.

Our daughter Haley has quickly formed a bond with her and we know it will just get stronger and stronger. I cannot say enough good things about this organization from beginning until now. I feel like we have a family. An incredibly knowledgeable, helpful and special family. We are so thankful for SDWR, Cheri and Mavis. We can’t wait to see her again soon.

Cara Manns

Mother of Diabetic Alert Dog Recipient

To find out more information about our Diabetic Alert Dogs at Service Dogs by SDWR please visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/.

Otis, an SDWR Diabetic Alert Dog, will help Matthew monitor and manage his diabetes.

Otis

July 26 is a day that 17-year old Matthew, a resident of Gulfport, FL, will long remember as the day he received his Type 1 Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR. Matthew’s dog, a Labrador Retriever named “Otis,”  has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR (SDWR) and through the rapport it develops with Matthew. SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and Diabetes.

Matthew was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, also referred to as “Juvenile Diabetes,” when he was just two years old. Since then, he has lived with the daily challenges of this life-threatening disease. Unlike Type 2 diabetes that can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day.  Matt’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates.  Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through canulas—similar to small IV catheters.  Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep.  Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1 as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels.  Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 diabetes.   Now with the arrival of the Otis, Matthew will have yet another tool, a four-legged one that has received foundational training to monitor his diabetes.

Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s Diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Matthew’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, his service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren.   Often diabetics don’t “feel” their blood sugar fluctuation and their bodies are slow to react to how their insulin pumps have been programmed. These events can lead to dangerous lows, which can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Implanted glucose monitoring systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement.  Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion.

People may also sleep right through a glucose monitor’s alarm, whereas a trained Diabetes alert dog is taught to be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond.  Otis will help not only watch over Matthew during “night duty,” he will also be alongside Matthew during his favorite activities that are mostly outdoors.  Matt enjoys fishing and boating—and Otis will too! Because he is a service dog trained to assist just one person, Otis is covered under all Americans with Disabilities laws.  Otis can accompany Matthew to school, also to restaurants, shopping, even doctors and hospital visits.

Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house.  Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed.

Otis will also work with the SDWR trainers and Matthew towards public access certification.  Dan Warren is quick to point out that, “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work, and dedication of the Organization and the family who must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals.  This is about an 18-month training program.”

What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.”  According to Dan Warren, “that important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away.  For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results.  To date, we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.”  To make or donation or learn more about how to get a diabetic service dog from SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org/. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/.  To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

Diabetic Alert Dog to Help Man Manage and Monitor His Type 1 Diabetes

On July 15th Scott, a resident of Sewickley, PA, receives his Type 1 Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR. Scott’s dog, a Labrador Retriever named “Oscar,” has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR (SDWR) and through the rapport it develops with Scott. SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and Diabetes.

Scott has lived with Type 1 Diabetes much of his life and along with the diagnosis are the daily challenges of this life-threatening disease. Unlike Type 2 Diabetes that can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day. Scott also faces a battle with Kidney Disease and weekly trips to receive dialysis. Scott’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates.  Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through canulas — similar to small IV catheters. Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep. Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1 as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels. Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 Diabetes. Now with the arrival of the Oscar, Scott will have yet another tool, a four-legged one, that has received foundational training to monitor and manage his Diabetes.

Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s Diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Scott’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, his service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren. Often diabetics don’t “feel” their blood sugar fluctuation and their bodies are slow to react to how their insulin pumps have been programmed. These events can lead to dangerous lows, which can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Implanted glucose monitoring systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement. Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion. Scott does experience hypo and hyperglycemic unawareness and that was a major factor in his decision to get an alert dog. A normal person’s glucose level is approximately 100. Scott has dropped to as low as 25 and as high as 1100 — these are not life-supporting levels.

People may also sleep right through a glucose monitor’s alarm. A trained Diabetes alert dog is taught to be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond. Scott copes, like so many Type 1 individuals do, with the anxiety and depression that comes along with a life-threatening disease. Oscar will help not only Scott with this Diabetes but will also provide comfort through anxiety and depression episodes. Oscar will be alongside Scott during his weekly dialysis trips. Because he is a service dog trained to assist just one person, Oscar is covered under all Americans with Disabilities laws. Oscar will not only accompany Scott to dialysis, doctor and hospital visits, but also to places like restaurants, shopping and movie theaters.

Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house. Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed.

Oscar will also work with the SDWR trainers and Scott towards public access certification. Dan Warren is quick to point out that “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work and dedication of the Organization and the family who must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals. This is about an 18-month training program.”

What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.” According to Dan Warren, “that important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away. For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results. To date we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about how to get a diabetic service dog from SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

Somerdale, NJ – July 11, 2017 – (Newswire.com)

July 11 has been a long-awaited day for 11-year-old Catherine, “Cate,” a young girl who lives in Somerdale, New Jersey, as she meets her Type 1 Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR.  Cate’s dog, a Labrador Retriever named “Stella,” has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR (SDWR) and through the rapport it develops with Cate and her parents Liz and Scott.  SDWR has a mission to provide specially bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and in the case of Cate, Type 1 Diabetes.

Cate was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when she was just four years old and she has lived with the daily challenges of this life-threatening disease. Unlike Type 2 Diabetes that can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day.  Cate’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates.  Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through cannulas—similar to small IV catheters.  Cate’s Diabetes is further complicated by a diagnosis of Celiac—a condition where the body does not absorb food properly.  Celiac can cause drastic drops in Cate’s blood glucose level.  Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep.  Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1 as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels.  Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 Diabetes.   Now with the arrival of the Stella, Cate and her parents will have yet another tool, a four-legged one that has received foundational training to monitor her Diabetes.

Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s Diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Cate’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, her service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren.   Often diabetics don’t “feel” their blood sugar fluctuation and these events can lead to dangerous lows which can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Implanted glucose monitoring systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement.  Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion. “Cate has hypoglycemic unawareness,” says mom, Liz, “and that is a major factor for us getting Stella for her. She cannot feel when her glucose levels are going too low.”  Liz continues, “If Stella can make just one life-saving alert, she will have been worth all the fundraising and efforts to get her.”

People may also sleep right through a glucose monitor’s alarm, whereas a trained Diabetes alert dog is taught to be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond.   Stella will not only handle “night duty” but will also be with Cate throughout all her activities from softball to her artistic pursuits of drawing and writing.  Because she is a service dog trained to assist just one person, Stella is covered under all Americans with Disabilities laws.  Stella will be with Cate at restaurants, stores, and trips to doctors or even the hospital.  Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house.  Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed.  All these trained activities help ease the concern that parents may have as their child ventures outside of the home environment.

Stella will also work with the SDWR trainers and Cate towards public access certification.  Dan Warren is quick to point out that, “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work, and dedication of the Organization and the family who must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals.  This is an 18-month training program.”

What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.”  According to Dan Warren, “that important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away.  For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results.  To date, we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.”  To make or donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org/. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/.  To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3408667#ixzz4mcLC5tH1

Service Dog trained to detect high and low glucose levels for small child in North Carolina

June 7 is a very special day for a young boy, Bennett, who lives in North Carolina as his Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR arrives today. Bennett, who is just 3, receives a Labrador Retriever named “Josie.”

Josie has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR (SDWR) and through the rapport it develops with Bennett and his parents, Adam and Maggie. SDWR has a mission to provide specially bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and Diabetes.

Bennett and his family traveled to the SDWR facility just two months ago to meet Josie for the first time. They joined other SDWR families at one of the many yearly reunion events held by the Organization at its facility. “We think it is very important to give families who face the challenges of living with a disability the chance to come together, to get to know each other and become the support system that is always needed,” says Lucinda Williams, Director of Development. “The SDWR family events are highlights in our year as we see families with our service dogs come together to talk with families waiting to receive one of our amazing dogs. These interactions are rewarding experiences for the entire SDWR family — from Board members to staff along with current clients and those waiting for their service dogs.”

Bennett was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 2 and has lived with the daily challenges of this life-threatening disease. His father, Adam, also has Type 1 Diabetes. Unlike Type 2 diabetes, which can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas, causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day.  Bennett’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through canulas — similar to small IV catheters. Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep.  Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1 as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels. Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now, with the arrival of the Josie, Bennett will have yet another tool, a four-legged one that has received foundational training to monitor his diabetes.

Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Bennett’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, his service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren. Often, diabetics don’t “feel” their blood sugar fluctuation and their bodies are slow to react to how their insulin pumps have been programmed. These events can lead to dangerous lows, which can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Implanted glucose monitoring systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement. Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion.

People may also sleep right through a glucose monitor’s alarm, whereas a trained diabetes alert dog is taught to be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond. Josie will accompany Bennett everywhere. His mother Maggie states, “we just want this dog to help Bennett live the most normal life possible with Type 1 Diabetes.”

Since Josie has been trained to serve just one person — Bennett, she is covered under all Americans with Disabilities service dog laws. Josie will accompany Bennett to restaurants, shopping, even doctors and hospital visits and, eventually, school. Josie may do some “double duty” helping Bennett’s father Adam manage his Type 1 diabetes, as well. At the recent family event in Madison, Josie alerted both Bennett and Adam to blood glucose changes and she received a lot of treats and “loving” for her good work.

Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house. Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed. All these trained activities help ease the concern that parents may have as their child ventures outside of the home environment.

Josie will also work with the SDWR trainers and Bennett’s parents toward public access certification. Dan Warren is quick to point out that “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work and dedication of the Organization and the family who must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals. This is about an 18-month training program.”

What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods, and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.” According to Dan Warren, “that important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away. For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results. To date, we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure … there’s a dog.” To make a donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org/. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs, visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser, visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/.

Diabetes Help with Four Legs and a Tail delivered to young adult in Foxfield, Colorado

June 2nd is a day that 16-year-old Christina, a resident of Foxfield, Colorado, will long remember as the day she received her Type 1 Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR.

Christina’s dog, a Labrador Retriever named “Jack,” has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR (SDWR) and through the rapport it develops with Christina and her parents, Lori and Larry. SDWR has a mission to provide specially bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and Diabetes.

Christina was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, also referred to as “Juvenile Diabetes,” when she was just 5 years old. Since then, she has lived with the daily challenges of this life-threatening disease. Unlike Type 2 diabetes, which can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas, causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day.

Christina’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through canulas — similar to small IV catheters. Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep.  Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1, as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels. Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now with the arrival of the Jack, Christina will have yet another tool, a four-legged one that has received foundational training, to monitor her diabetes.

Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Christina’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, her service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren.

Often diabetics don’t “feel” their blood sugar fluctuation and their bodies are slow to react to how their insulin pumps have been programmed. These events can lead to dangerous lows, which can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Implanted glucose monitoring systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement. Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion.

People may also sleep right through a glucose monitor’s alarm, whereas a trained diabetes alert dog is taught to be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond. Christina and her parents cope, like so many Type 1 families do, with the anxiety that comes along with a life-threatening disease. Jack will help not only Christina with this anxiety — but also her parents, Lori and Larry. Jack will be alongside Christina during her school day, as well with her during her favorite activities like dancing, reading, and traveling. The family enjoys flying or traveling by RV, and Jack will go everywhere with them. Because he is a service dog trained to assist just one person, Jack is covered under all Americans with Disabilities laws. Jack will not only accompany Christina to school and dance events but also to restaurants, school, shopping — even doctors and hospital visits.

Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house. Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed. All these trained activities help ease the concern that parents may have as their child ventures outside of the home environment.

Jack will also work with the SDWR trainers and Christina toward public access certification. Dan Warren is quick to point out that “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work and dedication of the Organization and the family, who must work together to build on training foundations and fundamentals. This is about an 18-month training program.”

What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods, and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.” According to Dan Warren, “That important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away. For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results. To date, we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”

Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.” To make or donation or learn more about how to get a diabetic service dog from SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org/. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs, visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser, visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/ .

PRESS RELEASE UPDATED: MAY 7, 2017 08:24 EDT
Diabetic Alert Dog helps active 14 year old girl stay safe and well
Thousand Oaks, CA, May 7, 2017 (Newswire.com) – Today, Emma, a 14 year old from Thousand Oaks, California, meets her Type 1 Diabetic Alert Dog delivered by Service Dogs by SDWR. Emma’s dog, a Labrador Retriever named “Mocha,” has already received thousands of hours of training as a diabetic alert dog and it will continue to learn under the careful guidance of a certified trainer from Service Dogs by SDWR, “SDWR,” and through the rapport it develops Emma and her parents. SDWR has a mission to provide specially-bred and trained dogs for adults and children with invisible disabilities like Autism, PTSD, Seizure Disorders, and Diabetes.
Emma is an active young lady who enjoys dance classes, Regiment Band, camping and going to the beach. But Emma also lives with the life-threatening challenges of Type 1 Diabetes. Diagnosed at just six years of age, Emma knows the daily life with a dozen or more finger-poke blood glucose checks, counting carbohydrate intake, and night-time blood glucose checks by her parents. Unlike Type 2 diabetes that can often be controlled with a balanced diet and watching one’s weight, Type 1 is caused when a virus attacks and permanently shuts down a person’s pancreas causing them to need insulin 24 hours a day. Emma’s diet must contain a careful balance of foods with a special focus on the amount and intake of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates have to be covered by insulin injection or through an insulin pump that is attached to the body delivering insulin through canulas—similar to small IV catheters. Blood glucose levels have to be monitored several times each day and night, as well as after exercise or sleep. Common illnesses like a cold or flu are especially difficult for people with Type 1 as viruses and fevers almost always cause spikes in glucose levels. Blood glucose levels that are too high or too low are life-threatening events for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now with the arrival of the Mocha, Emma will have yet another tool, a four-legged one that has received foundational training to monitor her diabetes and keep her from experiencing dangerous high and low blood glucose levels—especially frequent when a lifestyle is as active as Emma’s!
Dan Warren, Founder and President of Service Dogs by SDWR, indicates that the Organization’s diabetes alert dogs are trained to recognize and alert on the scent of low and or high blood glucose levels. “When Emma’s blood glucose begins to fluctuate, her service dog will pick up the scent and give the alert for ‘high’ or ‘low’ blood glucose levels,” states Warren. These hypo and hyperglycemic events, dangerous highs and lows, can result in seizures, coma, and even death. Many Type 1 patients have implanted glucose monitoring systems but these systems are often 20 minutes behind an alert dog’s sense of the glucose movement. Electronic systems measure parts per million while alert dogs have been shown to scent parts per trillion. A trained diabetes alert dog is taught to alert and be persistent to the point where it will go get another member of the household if the dog’s “person” does not respond.
Mocha will not only take care of Emma at home, she will accompany her to band camp, dance classes and enjoy the family-favorite activities such as camping and trips to the beach. As a service dog, her right to be with Emma in all public places is protected under Americans with Disabilities laws. Mocha will go with Emma to restaurants, shopping, to doctors and hospital visits and eventually she will attend college with Emma.
Additionally, these amazing dogs are trained to retrieve essentials needed such as Glucose tablets, Glucagon, insulin, juice boxes, testing meters or retrieve medication from a designated spot in the house. Alert dogs are further trained to dial out on K-9 equipped phones to summon emergency medical help if needed. All these trained activities help ease the concern that parents of a young child with Type 1 Diabetes.
Mocha will also work with the SDWR trainers and Emma towards public access certification. Dan Warren is quick to point out that, “all the incredible services these dogs can provide are through progression, hard work and dedication of the Organization and the individual and family who must work together to build on diabetic alert dog training foundations and fundamentals. This is about an 18-month training program.”
What sets SDWR apart from other service dog organizations are the customized training methods and SDWR matches dogs to their “person.” According to Dan Warren, “that important bonding time between dog and person can begin to happen right away. For the over seven years we’ve been utilizing this method of dog placement, we’ve achieved amazing results. To date we have almost 600 dogs working across the country and around the globe.”
Service Dogs by SDWR is a non-profit organization based in Madison, Virginia, and relies on donations to help the Organization in its mission, “Until there’s a cure…there’s a dog.” To make or donation or learn more about SDWR, please visit the website, https://www.sdwr.org/. To learn more about Diabetic Alert Service Dogs visit https://www.sdwr.org/service-dogs/diabetic-alert/. To find out how you can volunteer or serve as a puppy raiser visit https://www.sdwr.org/volunteers-opportunities/ .